Vintage Kitchen Table

Vintage kitchen table with extendable leaves

Today's post is about a vintage kitchen table circa 1920's to 1930's. It's very similar to another table that I refinished (you can see that project HERE) , so I was quick to snatch it up once I spotted it in the thrift store.


BEFORE

The finish to the top was worn and uneven. Hidden leaves are tucked underneath each end of the table. Unfortunately, the leaves wouldn't slide out, but I bought it with the hope that I could make the necessary repairs.

Before: Vintage kitchen table
Before: Vintage kitchen table

I turned the table over onto its back for further inspection. It was very dirty, so I spent an hour vacuuming the dirt and scrubbing the grime a few times. Turns out removing the dirt that had accumulated in the tracks over the years was the key to "repairing" the table. I wish all repairs were that easy!

Cleaning underneath the table.
Cleaning underneath the table.

The finish on the table top was very uneven and worn, but still parts of it retained a beautiful patina.

Before: Uneven and worn finish.
Before: Uneven and worn finish.

I used my orbital sander to remove the remaining finish.

Using an orbital sander on the table top.
Using an orbital sander on the table top.

I sanded it back as far as I dared, but there were still some imperfections and stains. I was reluctant to paint the top, so at this point I wanted to use something that would help me work the character back into the finish. I decided to use Danish Oil to bring out the color of the wood and help condition it. The Danish Oil does slightly stain the wood, but it's not as heavy as a regular stain. It's very easy to apply. Just pour it on and spread it out with a lint free cloth. After the Danish Oil was completely dry I further sealed the table with a top coat to give it further protection.

Applying Danish Oil to wood table top.
Applying Danish Oil to wood table top.
(Wear gloves when applying. I took my gloves off so I could get a picture.)

I love the patina and character of the new finish! There is one large-ish round spot on the table top that you can see better in one of the "after" photos. I don't think it's too unsightly, but if it doesn't sell then I might need to paint the top to cover up the blemish. Sometimes the market dictates what needs to be done.

Beautiful patina after applying Danish Oil.
Beautiful patina after applying Danish Oil.

In the meantime, I needed a place to store the table until I listed it for sale. So I put it in the center of my kitchen. It's worked great as an island. Or I pull up some chairs if we need extra seating for company. But it really came in handy for sewing projects! The expandable leaves made it the perfect size for cutting fabric.

Table used to cut and measure fabric.
Table used to cut and measure fabric.

I also used it to iron fabric for another project I was working on.

Table used for ironing fabric.
Table used for ironing fabric.

And I also used it to set up my sewing machine to sew a cross back apron made out of a canvas drop cloth. The apron is perfect to use while painting furniture!

Sewing machine on table.
Sewing machine on table.


AFTER

Ah and here's the after! Isn't the table darling?

Vintage kitchen table circa 1920's - 1930's.
Vintage kitchen table circa 1920's - 1930's.

Both leaves slide out easily to extend the surface space and then slide back in when not in use.

Vintage kitchen table with leaves extended.
Vintage kitchen table with leaves extended.

Here's an overview of the wood top with the leaves extended.

Table top refinished with Danish Oil.
Table top refinished with Danish Oil.

I painted the base of the table in Graphite and lightly sanded the edges. Next I sealed it with clear wax, and then applied dark wax to further deepen the color.

Graphite Chalk Paint with dark wax.
Graphite Chalk Paint with dark wax.

I just finished up four ladder back chairs and was getting them ready for staging, so I added a shot with the chairs around the table. Although the table and chairs are not originally a set, I think it provides a good example of how to coordinate different pieces with paint.

Vintage table and ladder back chairs.
Vintage table and ladder back chairs.

The main prop I used in today's post is a vintage Bay City Hardware Company scale which is from the same era as the table. The apples are fresh as opposed to vintage. There were more apples, but they were eaten, so I had to shoot my photos quickly before my props were gone.

Vintage Bay City Hardware Company Scale with apples.
Vintage Bay City Hardware Company Scale with apples.

Thank you so much for stopping by my blog today! I'll post the ladder back chair project soon, so if you're a new reader be sure to enter your email address in the "subscribe" button at the top right of the page to receive notifications of new projects. Or follow me on Facebook.  New friends are always welcome!

Supply List


Below are the supplies I used for this project. Some links are affiliate links which  means I earn a small commission if you make a purchase. It doesn't cost you extra, but it helps support the time and effort of maintaining the blog. Thank you for your support and understanding!




Rejuvenate your wood furniture with Danish Oil

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