Friday, February 17, 2017

Side Table: Add a Touch of Elegance with Stencils

This side table was manufactured circa mid-century. I wouldn't label it as "Mid-century Modern", but it's from the mid-century era. I loved the clean simple lines of the piece, so I snatched it up.

Vintage mid-century side table
Vintage mid-century side table

It was in good structural shape, but the bolts on the legs needed tightening (easy fix). The finish on the top was badly scratched.

Before: Damaged surface on top of table
Before: Damaged surface on top of table

I cleaned the table with a bit of soap and water. The photo below was actually taken on the second cleaning, and although the water looks dirty, the darkness is actually coming from the tannin in the wood as the original finish had been worn away. That's a big clue that the tannin will bleed through the paint.

Tannin from wood when washed
Tannin from wood

So I applied two thorough coats of shellac to prevent bleed through problems.

Apply two thorough coats of shellac to prevent bleed through
Apply two thorough coats of shellac to prevent bleed through

I painted the base in French Linen and the top and bottom shelf in Old White. I applied a stenciled border to the top in French Linen. I used a square ruler to tape off an angle at the corner.

Use a square ruler to tape off the corner turn for the stencil
Use a square ruler to tape off the corner turn for the stencil

To turn the corner for the stencil, I lined up a second piece of tape, and then removed the first.

Apply another strip of tape to the outer edge of the first piece. Remove the first piece of tape and continue stenciling.
Apply another strip of tape to the outer edge of the first piece.
Remove the first piece of tape and continue stenciling.

I continued the stencil around the edge in Old white.

Use painter's tape to hold the stencil in place.
Use painter's tape to hold the stencil in place.


After

I lightly sanded the entire piece to give it a time-worn look. I sealed the paint with soft clear wax. It still has the clean lines, but I think the new color scheme and stencils adds a little elegance to the piece.

After: French Linen and Old White with contrasting stencils.
After: French Linen and Old White with contrasting stencils.

Here's a close up of the stencils and distressing.

Bordered stencil with light distressing.
Bordered stencil with light distressing.

Finally here's a side-by-side of the before and after:

Vintage mid-century side table: before and after.
Vintage mid-century side table: before and after.

I've posted some photos of new projects that I will be working on in the Upcoming Projects page, so stop over if you want a sneak peek. Or if you want to receive an alert when a new project is posted you can enter your email address in the "Follow by Email" button on the top right of the blog page. Or you can follow me on my Facebook page. New friends are always welcome!

Supply List

Below are the supplies I used for this project. Some (not all) links are affiliate links which  means I earn a (very) small commission (ha ha) if you make a purchase. It doesn't cost you extra, but it helps support the time and effort of maintaining the blog. Thank you for your support and understanding!

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Vintage Pedestal Table

I left the thrift store without this pedestal table for two reasons. First it was overpriced and second the damage on the scalloped edge was severe. But I kept thinking about it, so I went back to the store later that day and sealed the deal. Both the cashier and the lady behind me in line agreed it was a project piece for sure and wished me luck. I could see in their eyes they thought it was hopeless, but I thought I could give the table a second chance.

Today I will walk you through the process of how I transformed this sweet table. It's a LONG post, so simply scroll to the bottom if you just want to see the "after".

Learn how to repair severe damage to scalloped trim on a pedestal table.
Before: Pedestal table with
severe damage to the scalloped edge.

As you can see in the photo, there was significant damage to the veneer on the scalloped edge. My Plan A was to try to recreate the edge. Plan B was a little vague, so I'm happy to report that Plan A worked.

Repair Damage

Easy repair method for damaged veneer.
Easy repair method for damaged veneer.

Luckily there were some areas still intact which I used for a pattern. For the first part of the repair I used veneer edging, painters tape, a pencil, and scissors. (I'll include a full supply list at the end of the post).
Supplies used for the repair.
Supplies used for the repair.

The first step is to trace the pattern of the scalloped edge. One side of the new edging is a thin piece of wood (right side) and the other side has adhesive (wrong side). I cut a piece of edging from the roll and taped it to an undamaged area wrong side out.

Tape the new edging wrong side out.
Tape the new edging wrong side out.

Here's a closer look at the side with adhesive. I lined up the top of the edging with the top of the scalloped edge. There was a gap at the bottom which I later filled in with wood filler as I planned to paint the table, but there are wider strips of edging that could be used instead.

Taped wrong side out to trace the pattern.
Taped wrong side out to trace the pattern.

 Next I used a pencil to trace the scalloped pattern on the "right" side.

Trace the pattern on the "right" side with a pencil.
Trace the pattern on the "right" side with a pencil.

After the pattern was traced I removed it from the edging.

Pattern transferred to new edging.
Pattern transferred to new edging.

And then I cut along the pencil line with scissors. The product is very easy to work with and no special power tools are required.

Cut out the pattern with scissors.
Cut out the pattern with scissors.

I cut the edging to size of the damaged area. Normally you cut a little larger, adhere it, and then trim it to size, but it was a tight spot, so I decided to cut it to size to start with.

Tape "right" side out to the damaged area.
Tape "right" side out to the damaged area.

Then I used a hot iron to activate the adhesive. I covered my iron with aluminum foil to prevent damaging my iron. 

Affix the new edging with a hot iron.
Affix the new edging with a hot iron.

The adhesive activates very quickly. Once it cooled down I removed the tape. Next I applied wood filler to fill in the gap at the bottom of the edging and to other areas on the table with chipped veneer.

New edging in place!
New edging in place! Apply wood filler to fill in any gaps.

After the wood filler was dry I sanded it somewhat smooth. The other areas of the edging weren't completely smooth, so I didn't spend too much time trying to get a perfect finish.

Sand the wood filler smooth.
Sand the wood filler smooth.


I planned to apply a distressed painted finish, so I applied a stain to the repaired area to blend it in a little.

Apply stain to repaired area.
Apply stain to repaired area.

Painting

Before I started painting I applied a coat of clear shellac to the entire table to prevent bleed through. Now for the fun part! I applied a base coat of Coco to the entire table.

Applying Coco as a base coat.
Applying Coco as a base coat.

I taped off the the top of the table and painted Duck Egg blue over the base and edging.

Duck Egg blue applied for the second coat.
Duck Egg blue applied for the second coat.

Painting with a steady hand is great but for tight areas it's a time saver to just tape it off. Use small strips of painters tape to tape rounded edges. It looks time consuming, but actually goes fairly quickly.

Taping off curved and rounded edges is easy!
Taping off curved and rounded edges is easy!

The overlap pattern makes for easy removal of the tape. Rather than removing each section individually, pull up one piece and then continue to pull up gently to remove the tape in large sections.

Peel back the tape in large sections.
Peel back the tape in large sections.

I taped off the outer edge and applied one coat of Old Ochre. I used a hair dryer to speed up the drying process and to add bits of crackle finish here and there.

Hair dryer used to speed up drying and to crackle the paint.
Hair dryer used to speed up drying and to crackle the paint.

Stencils


I chose a floral border for the table top using a stencil. The colors I used were Scandinavian Pink, Chateau Grey, and Antibes Green. I put small amounts of the paints onto a Styrofoam plate to work off of.

Colors used for stencil: Scandinavian Pink, Chateau Grey, and Antibes Green.
Colors used for stencil:
Scandinavian Pink, Chateau Grey, and Antibes Green.

I had three small flat brushes on hand to apply the paint. Use a small amount of paint and gently wipe it over the stencil without pushing paint under the edges.

Brush small amounts of paint over the stencil.
Brush small amounts of paint over the stencil.

I applied highlights of Antibes Green over the leaf areas for a little extra dimension.

Layer colors for highlights and dimension.
Layer colors for highlights and dimension.

The stencil I used wasn't curved to fit the round border, so I stenciled one flower and then re-positioned the stencil as I went around the table.

Pedestal table with stenciled border.
Pedestal table with stenciled border.

I liked the look of the table at this point, but thought it was a little too sweet, so I wet distressed the paint with a damp wash cloth. By rubbing gently it will remove bits of the top layer of paint. Rubbing harder will give it a more distressed appearance. I lightly sanded the stenciled areas with 220 grit sandpaper to fade the paint just a bit. I sealed the entire table with clear wax and then applied dark wax to give it an aged patina.
Use a damp washcloth to wet distress the paint.
Use a damp washcloth to wet distress the paint.

Gold

Next I applied gold highlights to the edges of the table and the details here and there. I put a small amount of Rub-n-Buff on a plastic lid and dabbed a bit on my finger. 

Dab finger in gold Rub-n-Buff.
Dab finger in gold Rub-n-Buff.

Then I lightly rubbed my finger along the edges. If too much gold is applied it's easy to remove before the gold cures with a little bit of clear wax.

Rub gold highlights along the edges.
Rub gold highlights along the edges.

After

And here we are finally at the finish line. Thanks for making it this far!

After: Vintage pedestal table.
After: Vintage pedestal table.

Here's a close up of the repaired section of veneer.

Repaired scalloped border.
Repaired scalloped border.

Hints of gold highlights on the table give the piece just a hint of glamour from days gone by.

Hints of golden glamour from days gone by.
Hints of golden glamour from days gone by.

This photo shows the effects of the techniques used in the project: layering of paint, wet distressing, dark wax, and gold highlights.
Create a vintage look with layered paint, wet distressing, and dark wax.
Create a vintage look with layered paint, wet distressing, and dark wax.

Here's an overhead shot of the stenciled border. The scalloped trim is almost as good as new.

Stenciled border on vintage pedestal table.
Stenciled border on vintage pedestal table.

Finally a side-by-side of the before and after. I had a lot of fun working on this project and am glad I went back to the thrift store to buy the table!

Vintage pedestal table before and after.
Vintage pedestal table before and after.

Thank you for stopping by my blog today. I hope you found the information helpful and that it gives you inspiration to give it a try. If you would like to receive alerts of new posts you can enter your email address in the Follow box on the top right of the screen. New friends are always welcome! You can also follow me on my Facebook page.

Create a vintage look with wet distressing and dark wax.

Supply List


Below are the supplies I used for this project. Some (not all) links are affiliate links which  means I earn a (very) small commission (ha ha) if you make a purchase. It doesn't cost you extra, but it helps support the time and effort of maintaining the blog. Thank you for your support and understanding!

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Chippy Table

My initial plan was to give this table a traditional look and use it as a small side table next to my husband's recliner. But as I got started on the project I decided to go for a chippy look. I suppose I just wasn't in the mood that day for traditional. Instead I decided to give this modern day piece a little bit of vintage charm.

After: Chippy layered paint on small table  gives a modern piece some vintage charm.
After: Chippy layered paint on small table
gives a modern piece some vintage charm.
First I painted the entire table with a base coat of Coco. Next I applied Aubusson Blue to the base and Old White to the top.

Layered paint and dark wax on small table.
Layer chalk paint for a time worn look.
Dark wax was applied to further age the table.
 I chipped away some of the Old White with the back of a knife.

Use a knife to chip away the paint.
Use a knife to chip away the paint.

I used a damp wash cloth to wet distress the top coat of paint to reveal the base color underneath. Applying just a little more water and presser also helps achieve a chippy look. The best part is if you're not happy with the look you can simply paint right over it. I was happy with the look, so I applied a coat of clear wax to seal the paint and then applied dark wax to age it a bit more.

Use a damp wash cloth to wet distress the paint.
Use a damp wash cloth to wet distress the paint.

Did you think I forgot to include a "before" photo? Here is a side-by-side of the before and after:

WOW! Before and after: Modern table gets vintage charm!
Modern table gets vintage charm!

And finally here is one more side-by-side comparison of the top of the table which illustrates the difference you can create in a modern table to give it the charm of a vintage piece:

Before and After: small modern table gets a new (old) look.
Before and After: small modern table gets a new (old) look.

My living room has traditional decor, so this table won't work there. But I think it would be a fun piece to use as a plant stand, or near an entryway or mudroom as a catch-all for keys and cell phones. Or maybe in a bathroom for displaying bath salts and pretty soaps?
The Black Sheep Shoppe: Giving furniture a second chance.
I appreciate you taking the time to stop by my blog today. Your support and encouragement means a lot to me!

Supply List

Below are the supplies I used for this project. Some (not all) links are affiliate links which  means I earn a (very) small commission (ha ha) if you make a purchase. It doesn't cost you extra, but it helps support the time and effort of maintaining the blog. Thank you for your support and understanding!
  • Chalk Paint by Annie Sloan, Paint colors: Coco, Aubusson blue, and Old White. Wax: clear and dark. Click on the link to find where you can by her products from local stockists. Some stockists also ship via online orders!
  • Wooster Vintage Effects paintbrush (2" angled china bristle)
  • Knife (look for an old one at a thrift store)
  • Washcloth and water

Saturday, February 4, 2017

Queen Anne Side Table

I picked up this circa mid-century Queen Anne side table at a thrift store recently. It's a nice solid table, but the finish was in rough shape and the tray above the drawer was so tight it wouldn't slide open.

Before


Before: Queen Anne style side table
 Before: Queen Anne style side table

It still had the original tag tucked inside the drawer, and it was actually called a lamp table. It was made by Imperial in Grand Rapids, and sold by The Rike Kumler Company in Dayton, Ohio.

Original tag sold by The Rike-Kumler Co. in Dayton, Ohio.
Original tag sold by The Rike-Kumler Co. in Dayton, Ohio.

I used wood glue to re-adhere the loose veneer. Sanding was required on the interior guides for the tray to loosen it up enough to slide open and closed.

Loose veneer was re-affixed with wood glue.
Loose veneer was re-affixed with wood glue.

I knew the tannin from the wood was going to bleed through the paint, so I applied shellac with a foam brush.

Apply shellac to prevent bleed through.
Apply shellac to prevent bleed through.

After

I choose Linen White Chalked Paint by Rustoleum for the table to give it a fresh and clean look. It will work beautifully as a side table in a living room, but it will also function perfectly as a night stand.

After: Queen Anne Style side table painted in Linen White.
After: Queen Anne Style side table painted in Linen White.

The tray above the drawer now slides open easily.

Side table with drawer and tray.
Side table with drawer and tray.

I painted the hardware in Paris Grey for contrast and extra elegance. I used sandpaper to apply distressing around the edges and details. The scalloped trim on this piece is especially beautiful.

Scalloped trim on side table.
Scalloped trim on side table.

Here's a side-by-side comparison of the before and after.

Queen Anne style side table before and after.
Queen Anne style side table before and after.

Thank you so much for stopping by today. I have some really great projects that I've finished up and will be sharing soon, so if you'd like to receive an email alert of new posts, just fill in the "follow by email" box located at the top right portion of the screen. New friends are always welcome!

The Black Sheep Shoppe: Giving furniture a second chance!
The Black Sheep Shoppe: Giving furniture a second chance!

Supply list 

Below are the supplies I used for this project. Some (not all) links are affiliate links which  means I earn a (very) small commission (ha ha) if you make a purchase. It doesn't cost you extra, but it helps support the time and effort of maintaining the blog. Thank you for your support and understanding!