Monday, January 16, 2017

Thrift Store Coffee Table

I found this coffee table outside in the front of a thrift store. I asked the worker for the price, and he told me "99 cents". I told him that was too low, and asked again for the price. He told me it's 99¢ because no one will buy it. What? No one will buy it? Challenge accepted!

99¢ Thrift Store Table
99¢ Thrift Store Table

Before

The table has clean modern lines with a starburst patterned veneered top.

The thrift store table nobody would buy. Except me. I bought it!
The thrift store table nobody would buy.
Except me. I bought it!

The sides have a reeded walnut trim. To be honest I wouldn't have known what the trim was called except that the sticker underneath had a description which gave it away.

Reeded walnut trim.
Reeded walnut trim.

The table was scratched and REALLY dirty. So the first order of business was to give it a good cleaning.

Thrift store table with lots of spider webs.
No extra charge for the spider webs.

I know a lot of people use TSP (tri-sodium phosphate) for cleaning used furniture, and although it's effective, I find that it's too harsh and many times something less toxic will do the trick. So I wiped it down with Mr. Clean diluted in water, then a rinse of clean water, followed by an extra wipe down with Lysol wipes. I didn't take photos of each step of the cleaning process because my hands were so dirty!

Clean, rinse & sanitize
Clean, rinse & sanitize
I used my orbital sander and 80-grit sandpaper to quickly smooth out the surface scratches.

The orbital sander quickly removed the surface scratches.
The orbital sander quickly removed the surface scratches.

Once it was clean and dry, I applied Old Ochre (Annie Sloan Chalk Paint). I used a 2" angled brush for this project. It worked well on the flat surfaces as well as the nooks and crannies.

Applying Old Ochre paint with 2" angled brush.
Applying Old Ochre paint with 2" angled brush.

I followed the grain of the starburst veneer pattern when applying the paint to the top. The temperature outside was just above freezing, so it took a long time for the paint to dry. After it was dry I sanded the paint smooth, and then applied a second coat.

Waiting for the first coat of paint to dry.
Waiting for the first coat of paint to dry.

After

I sanded the second coat of paint smooth with a fine-grit sanding sponge. I used heavier pressure on the sanding sponge to wear away some of the paint on the top, sides, and legs. I used 220-grit sand paper to add heavier distressing to the edges.

Thrift store table painted in Old Ochre (Annie Sloan Chalk Paint).
Thrift store table painted in Old Ochre (Annie Sloan Chalk Paint).

Old Ochre is a beautiful neutral color with a soft beige undertone. I included a white candle stand in the photo to show how the Old Ochre contrasts with pure white.

Coffee table painted in Old Ochre contrasted with white candle holder.
Coffee table painted in Old Ochre contrasted with white candle holder.

I added varied amounts of distressing to the reeded walnut trim.

Varied distressing applied to the reeded walnut trim.
Varied distressing applied to the reeded walnut trim.

And here's a final look of the before and after. Hopefully it's no longer a table that no one wants to buy! But I'll price it a little higher than ninety-nine cents! 😉

Coffee table: Before & After.

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Supply List

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Something Old, Something New, Nothing Borrowed, Something Blue

So the table is old, and for something new I tried a new paint brush as well as a new brand of paint. I didn't borrow anything, but the paint is blue, hence the blog post title.

Vintage gate leg folding table.
Vintage gate leg folding table

I picked up this vintage gate leg folding table at a thrift store this summer while visiting in northern Ohio, It's exactly the same as another table that my daughter found for me. I've never seen this particular style of table before, and now they seem to be everywhere! The legs swing together so the table can be stored flat. A small project like this is great for practicing new techniques without the investment of a lot of time or money.

The legs swivel so the table can be stored flat.
The legs swivel so the table can be stored flat
One thing I've learned is the paint brush used on a project can make a significant impact on the final results. The new brush I purchased for this project is an angled china bristle brush with a short handle. It fits my hand well and is great for painting in tight spaces. The new paint is Serene Chalky Paint by Americana Decor. I typically use Annie Sloan Chalk Paint because you can't beat the quality, and I've tried some chalk-type paints but wasn't thrilled with the results. The color drew me in on this paint, so I decided to give it a try. By the way, this is not a sponsored post . . . I'm just sharing the products I used.

Trying new products: angled china bristle brush  & Americana Decor Chalky Paint.
Trying new products: angled china bristle brush
& Americana Decor Chalky Paint

When I first opened the container I was surprised at how thick the paint was. It was creamy like face cream and I was concerned that the jar might night be enough for my project. However, it spread extremely well and I barely used any paint. The angled brush was perfect for painting the spindles as well as the flat sections of the table. To quickly paint spindles, move the brush quickly back and forth in sections around the spindle. Then give it a couple of vertical swipes with the brush to smooth the paint out before the paint dries.

Quick method to paint spindles.
Quick method to paint spindles.

I wanted a shabby chic finish on the table, so I sanded the paint with a fine sanding sponge followed by 220-grit sandpaper for heavier distressing. The paint sanded differently from what I was used to. Not in a bad way -- just different. I'll need to try it on a couple of more projects to perfect my technique with this brand.

Vintage table painted in Serene blue.
Vintage table painted in Serene blue.

I sealed the paint with the Americana Decor creme wax. As much as I was surprised by the thick paint, I was more surprised by the consistency of the wax. It was very thin, but easy to spread.

Shabby chic distressed table top.
Shabby chic distressed table top.
The table folds up flat so it's easy to tuck away in storage when not in use.

The table folds up flat for easy storage.
The table folds up flat for easy storage.

I don't have a specific list of New Year's resolutions, but in general I've committed to learning and trying new things. Are you planning on trying something new in 2017?

Shabby chic vintage gate leg table.
Shabby chic vintage gate leg table.

Thank you so much for stopping by today! Let me know if you have any questions on this project. You'll need a Google+ account to comment on the blog, or you can message me on my Facebook page.

Supply List

Below are the supplies I used for this project. Some links are affiliate links which  means I earn a (really) small commission (ha ha) if you make a purchase. It doesn't cost you extra, but it helps support the time and effort of maintaining the blog. Thank you for your support and understanding!



Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Rustic Footstool in Napoleonic Blue

Rustic footstool before

While I was on my way to the cash register at a thrift store, I spotted this little footstool and scooped it up to add to my purchases. I'll let the pictures tell the rest of the story . . .

Before

Don't worry about a yucky finish

During

Apply one coat of Napoleonic blue chalk paint

One coat of Napoleonic blue chalk paint drying

Sand and distress the paint for a rustic finish

Wipe on clear wax with a lint free cloth

Brush on java glaze with a foam brush


Wipe off excess glaze with a shop towel

After

Rustic footstool painted in Napoleonic blue chalk paint

Java glaze tones down the Napoleonic blue

Rustic footstool before and after

I hope you enjoyed the photo-story of today's project! Thanks so much for stopping by!

Supply List

Below are the supplies I used for this project. Some links are affiliate links which  mean I earn a (really) small commission (ha ha) if you make a purchase. It doesn't cost you extra, but it helps support the time and effort of maintaining the blog. Thank you for your support and understanding!
  • Chalk Paint by Annie Sloan Napoleonic Blue and Soft Clear Wax. Click on the link to find where you can by her products from local stockists. Some stockists also ship via online orders.
  • Angled paint brush great for getting into the tight corners and controlling the amount of paint used.
  • 220-grit sand paper
  • Tack cloths for quick removal of sanding dust!
  • Lint free shop rags (for removing excess wax). These can also be used to buff the wax.
  • Decorative Glaze (For this project I used the Rustoleum brand that I found at Home Depot, but I also use General Finishes brand. Either one should give you awesome results.) The Java glaze tones down the brightness of the blue.
  • Disposable foam brushes
  • Shop towels (for removing excess glaze)

Sunday, January 1, 2017

Queen Anne Style Buffet

Antique Queen Anne Style Buffet Sideboard

I picked up this antique buffet at an auction. It's a very lovely piece and is constructed of solid wood, but it has sustained quite a bit of damage over the years. The most significant damage was to the applique and trim pieces. And unfortunately exact replacements are not available. So a little creativity was in order to put this piece back together again.

During

Actually none of the applique pieces had escaped damage, and each had a broken pieces or were missing entirely.

Broken and missing appliques
Broken and missing appliques

So the first order of business was to secure the remaining loose appliques with wood glue and clamped it until the glue was dry.

Clamp until the glue is dry
Clamp until the glue is dry

Next I filled a pastry bag with wood filler and piped a design into the missing areas. Once the wood filler was dry I sanded it to blend into the existing piece and then stained it.

Use a pastry bag and wood filler to repair missing trim.
Use a pastry bag and wood filler to repair missing trim.
I sanded the top of the buffet to remove the existing damage and then stained it with Antique Walnut. I sealed the stain with two coats of top coat. While the stain was drying, I decided to tackle the interior of the drawers.

The cutlery drawer was the most time consuming to work on. It was lined in what appeared to be the original felt which had worn away over the years. Nevertheless, the adhesive sure held up well, and after a bit of a struggle I was able to remove it. I used a metal scraper to scrape away any remaining adhesive. Afterward I stained the drawer bottoms in walnut.

Original drawer liner removed
Original drawer liner removed

After

The buffet is a substantial piece and makes a statement on its own, so I decided to go with a neutral color scheme. A bolder color might have been overpowering.

Queen Anne Style Buffet/Sideboard in Old Ochre
Queen Anne Style Buffet/Sideboard in Old Ochre

I applied light-to-medium distressing throughout.And unless you zoom in with a camera, the repairs aren't noticeable.

Repaired applique
Repaired applique

Although the repairs on the appliques aren't perfect, I think they blend in nicely after the paint was applied.

Re-attached loose applique
Re-attached loose applique

Re-created decorative trim with wood filler and pastry bag/tip
Re-created decorative trim with wood filler and pastry bag/tip

I stained and/or reconditioned each of the drawer interiors, but the interior shelves were in poor condition, so I painted those to match the exterior.

Stained top and drawer interiors in Antique Walnut
Stained top and drawer interiors in Antique Walnut

Top stained in Antique Walnut
Top stained in Antique Walnut

Antique buffet painted in Old Ochre

I finished this a month or so ago and it's been sitting in my living room ever since. Before I moved it I needed space for it in my booth, but more importantly I was waiting until someone big and strong was available to help my husband move it. My daughter's boyfriend Chris was visiting over the holidays and he and my husband moved it to the booth yesterday.

Supply List

Friday, December 30, 2016

Vintage 1920s Dresser

Before 1920s dresser with chipping paint
I found this 1920's dresser at a thrift store. It's one of my favorite styles and has three large drawers as well as two small drawers. The knobs were not original and there was a lot of surface damage, which is probably why someone painted it years ago.

Peeling and chipping paint must be removed
Peeling and chipping paint must be removed

During

Normally you don't need to remove paint prior to applying chalk paint. However, the black paint was chipping and flaking in many areas, and I wanted a good foundation to apply my paint to, so I decided to strip the dresser first. I avoid chemical strippers whenever possible because I don't like the gooey wet mess. I used an orbital sander and a mouse sander to remove the paint. Although the sanding dust is messy, it was easily cleaned up afterwards with a broom. Plus the sanders make a quick job of it. Be sure to use a sanding mask and protective eye glasses.

Remove paint quickly with an orbital sander. I used a mouse sander on the smaller areas.
Remove paint quickly with an orbital sander.
I used a mouse sander on the smaller areas.
Once the paint was stripped away I applied two coats of shellac to prevent the tannin from the bare wood from bleeding through the paint.

Apply shellac to prevent the tannin in bare wood from bleeding through.
Apply shellac to prevent the tannin in bare wood from bleeding through.

After applying the paint and distressing the finish with sandpaper, I sealed the finish with soft clear wax. A little wax goes a long way! Simply dab a small amount on a wax brush and brush it on then spread it evenly over the painted surface. Wipe away excess wax with a lint free cloth.

Seal chalk paint with clear wax. A little goes a long way!
Seal chalk paint with clear wax. A little goes a long way!

The interior of the drawers were in fairly good shape considering its age. However, the wood was dry and scratched. I used Restore-A-Finish to recondition the drawers and then applied beeswax conditioner. 
Recondition dry interior drawers.
Recondition dry interior drawers.

After

I wanted to give the dresser a bright and cheerful finish, so I painted the base of the dresser in Provence blue.

1920s dresser painted in Provence blue and Old White.
1920s dresser painted in Provence blue and Old White.

The dresser top and the knobs are painted in Old White. I sanded the paint back to allow the wood underneath to peek through which gives it an old farmhouse style.

Sand back the paint to almost a bare finish for a worn farmhouse look.
Sand back the paint to almost a bare finish for a worn farmhouse look.

I made some repairs to the veneer, but left other areas chipped and worked that into my design.

Incorporate damaged veneer into your design.
Damaged areas can be incorporated into the design.

Sometimes the damage looks out of place, but other times it gives a little history and charm to the piece.

The wear and tear through the years can be charming.
The wear and tear through the years can be charming.

The dresser sits on the original wood wheels.
The dresser sits on the original wood wheels.

The dresser sits on its original wood wheels.

Vintage wood wheel
Vintage wood wheel
 And finally, here are a couple of shots of the "before and after" for comparison.

Before and after. Damage on dresser repaired.

Vintage 1920s dresser before and after

Thanks so much for stopping by today! I wish you all a very happy, safe, and prosperous New Year.

Supply List (some links are affiliates)

  • Orbital sander and variety pack of sand paper (60, 80, 100, 150, 200-grit). The paint on this project was tough to remove, so I switched to 40-grit sandpaper and then worked progressively up to 220-grit for a smooth finish. Alternatively you could use CitriStrip to remove the finish.
  • Mouse sander used to reach the spots too tight or small for the orbital sander. 
  • Wood filler for repairing broken veneer
  • Shellac and disposable foam brushes brushes
  • Chalk Paint by Annie Sloan: Provence blue, Old White, and soft clear wax.
  • Small wax brush I have both a small and large wax brush, but if I had to choose only one I would go with the small brush. If you do a lot of projects then it's worth the investment to have both sizes.
  • Restore-A-Finish and Feed & Wax (for drawer interiors)